Malaysian Food

Malaysia’s cuisine reflects the multi-ethnic makeup of its population. The vast majority of Malaysians falls into one of three major categories: Malays, Chinese, and Indians. The people in the area are from Sabah and Sarawak in East Malaysia, the Orang Asli of Peninsular Malaysia, the mixed race communities of Peranakan & Eurasian creole or mixed race descent. Plus there are also significant numbers of foreign workers and expatriates

As a result of historical migrations, colonisation by foreign powers, and its geographical position within its wider home region, Malaysia’s culinary style in the present day is primarily a melange of traditions from its Malay, Chinese, Indian, Indonesian, Filipino and indigenous Bornean and Orang Asli, with light to heavy influences from Arab, Thai, Portuguese, Dutch and British cuisines, to name a few. There are a lot of flavors in Malaysian dishes and the variety keeps it interesting. The herbs & spices used depend on the dish that’s being prepared, as well as personal taste.

With such a close relation, it is common to find the same dish in both Singapore and Malaysia. For example, you might find a Singaporean version of Laksa and chicken rice in Malaysia. Malaysia shares culinary ties with other nations such as Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines. These countries often share dishes like satay and rendang.

Malaysian Chinese food is based on an eclectic repertoire of dishes with roots from Fujian, Teochew, Cantonese, Hakka and Hainanese cuisines. Nonetheless, Malaysian Indian food is a mixture of North-South Indian and Sri Lankan dishes which tend to be either dry or wet.

Malaysian Food You Must Try

Nasi lemak

Malaysians love their food, but of all Malaysian foods, Nasi Lemak has got to be one of them. What's Nasi Lemak? It's a dish that includes rice with a whole bunch of delicious toppings, including dried anchovies (ikan bilis), peanuts and peanut sauce. The sweet and salty flavours bring it all together. Malaysians also love other types of rice dishes such as laksa, a spicy noodle soup with fish cakes in a fragrant coconut-based broth; and nasi goreng (fried rice). Popular protein options include chicken curry, shrimp paste stir-fry or beef rendang—all delectable favourites.

Laksa

Malaysia is known for its hawker culture with amazing food that has been around for many years. One of the most popular Malaysian dishes is laksa. It's a spicy soup with coconut milk, made with rice noodles and shrimp, mainly eaten for breakfast. Laksa is a spicy soup that's mainly eaten for breakfast and lunch in Malaysia It consists of coconut milk, thick rice noodles (usually made of rice flour or tapioca starch), and shrimp or other seafood. The dish is usually garnished with green onions, cilantro leaves, cut cucumber, and roasted peanuts.

Mee Goreng Mamak

Mee goreng is a household name in Malaysia. It is a dish served at all times of the day and night. It is often served with side dishes such as cucumbers, begedil and fried chicken. This dish is usually made from yellow noodles, beef or chicken, shrimp and soy sauce with vegetables and eggs added for extra flavor. It is also spiced up with red chilli powder for those who like it a bit more spicy. Mee goreng can be found readily in most restaurants, roadside eateries or even hawker stalls in Malaysia. Moreover, it has earned itself a worldwide reputation for being the best supper dish to eat after prayers on Friday nights or during Ramadan periods because of its availability anytime and anywhere

Bak kut teh

Bak kut teh is a must-try food in Malaysia. This dish is traditionally made with pork ribs that are boiled in a broth of meat or soy sauce, garlic, and peppercorns. Bak Kut Teh, which means “meat bone tea” in Hokkien (a dialect) is commonly found all across Malaysia especially at night markets and night food courts. It sounds like a pretty simple dish to prepare but the flavors are complex and it's difficult to get it just right.

Satay

Satay is a dish of marinated meat, usually beef or chicken, that is grilled on a skewer and eaten with a spicy peanut sauce. Satay originated from Indonesia and popular in Malaysia, where it has evolved into something different than Indonesian satay. Malaysian satay is typically made from various vegetables like potatoes, onions and carrots as well as chicken or beef. This variation of satay is an amalgamation of Malay and Chinese cooking styles because the sauce includes both soy sauce and sweet black soy sauce." You can get your hands on Malaysian satays at any night markets in Kuala Lumpur. Or try them at Mamak restaurant.

Try Malaysian Food in Canada

Alberta

Le Special

3696 97st NW Edmonton, Alberta T6R 0T6

Bestsellers:

  • Cooked chicken satay
  • Cooked beef satay
  • Chicken satay wraps

British Columbia

Ah Ma's Kitchen

928 Richards St, Vancouver, BC V6B 3C1

Bestsellers: Satay Chicken rice Laksa

Ontario

Sugartiers Incorporated

32 Frank Endean Road, Richmond Hill, Ontario L4S 1X4

Bestsellers:

  • Nasi lemak
  • Spiral chicken curry puffs
  • Nyonya kuih and Kaya

Quebec

Satay

Satay is a dish of marinated meat, usually beef or chicken, that is grilled on a skewer and eaten with a spicy peanut sauce. Satay originated from Indonesia and popular in Malaysia, where it has evolved into something different than Indonesian satay. Malaysian satay is typically made from various vegetables like potatoes, onions and carrots as well as chicken or beef. This variation of satay is an amalgamation of Malay and Chinese cooking styles because the sauce includes both soy sauce and sweet black soy sauce." You can get your hands on Malaysian satays at any night markets in Kuala Lumpur. Or try them at Mamak restaurant.

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Malaysian High Commission in Ottawa

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Henry Leong Bee Lee
200 Consumers Road, Suite 808
Toronto Ontario M2J 4R4
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For appointments please call: (416) 618-0966
Email: henrylblee@rogers.com

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Fax: (905) 629-0421
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Malaysian Association of Canada
89 Donalda Crescent
Toronto, Ontario M1S 1P1
Canada

Who is Dr. Lawrence Loh, Peel Region’s top doctor? On May 2, Toronto Star named Dr. Loh as “The Man who took on Amazon, closed schools and defied expectations.”

Dr. Loh’s parents hail from Malaysia. He spent some years in Malaysia for school and college, before returning to Canada. Get to know Dr. Loh as he shares about his Malaysian heritage, hobbies, perspective on anti-Asian racism and hopes and dreams post-pandemic.